Maximizing MindManager 2012: Analysis View

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October 25, 2011

Maximizing MindManager 2012: Analysis View
Imagine this classic scenario: You are heading up a team that’s been tasked with performing a risk analysis on a new marketing campaign.  Your team has brainstormed what they think are the key risks for the program and entered them as topics into a map:
You want to evaluate which of these risks has both the greatest impact on the project and the highest chance of occurring. Is there an easy, fast way to accomplish this? MindManager 2012’s Analysis View.
Analysis View allows you to take topics from your map and place them in a relational two dimensional matrix.  If you have ever used the four quadrant matrix popularized by Stephen Covey (Urgency vs. Importance) or use the Boston Consulting Group’s Market Growth vs. Relative Market Share matrix,  then you could defiantly benefit from using Analysis View.
To get your team’s risks from the map into Analysis View, select all of the risks, then go to View, Analysis View and select New.
This opens up an Analysis window with the topics displayed in the Unsorted Topics list on the left.
Then select the Configure button to configure the Analysis View to meet your requirements.  (Included in MindManager 2012 are a set of nine predefined templates. If you can’t find a template, you can customize the view to meet your individual needs.) In the Configure menu  select the Risk Analysis template and then type in a view name of Lead Project Risks and click on Done to apply it to the view.  You can see the two main View types:
1. Segmented, which applies the diagonal bands you see in the image above to break the risks into three categories.
2. Quadrant, which would have no bands – allowing you to place the topics into one of the four quadrants in the matrix.
You can now move the topics from the unsorted list on the left to the view on the right.  In the view below you can move the topic “Growth Down” from the list on the left by selecting it, and then clicking on the Move Topic Into View button at the bottom of the unsorted topics list.
You can click on the topic to move it around in the analysis matrix, until its position reflects the opinion of the team. Note that the axes are based on relative rankings (they run from low to high).  The main purpose of moving the topics is to create a qualitative analysis of the relative position of each of the risks.
You can go ahead and add all of the other risks and then move them relative to each other.
As you can see, depending on where the topics fall on the bands on the chart, they are assigned the priorities 1, 2 or 3.  1 represents the highest risks (high likelihood and high impact on the project), 2 is medium risk and 3 is low risk.  The team can test the position of each topic against each other (i.e is the likelihood of missing a deadline higher or lower than that of a new competitor entering the market etc.).  You can also adjust the bands to increase or decrease the area covered by the three bands.  This is done by clicking on the Adjust Marker Region check box:
After checking the box, you then move the band markers to create the positions that you prefer.
You can also move the marker on the bottom axis over to the far right “high impact” end of the axis, changing the New Competitor topic from a priority 2 to a priority 3.
Finally, you can save this analysis view as a template (this is useful if you have customized it, and want to reuse it in the future). Then you can apply the markers back into my map, showing the results of my risk analysis.
This analysis view will be saved with the map, allowing you to document the relative ranking of the risks for the future. You can also use the Copy View to Clipboard button in the upper left hand corner to copy a bit map of the analysis view.  You can then place that view in an email or in an electronic document.
There you have it! Some highlights of the powerful possibilities available in the new Analysis View.Imagine this classic scenario: You are heading up a team that’s been tasked with performing a risk analysis on a new marketing campaign.  Your team has brainstormed what they think are the key risks for the program and entered them as topics into a map:

Imagine this classic scenario: You are heading up a team that’s been tasked with performing a risk analysis on a new marketing campaign.  Your team has brainstormed what they think are the key risks for the program and entered them as topics into a map:

MM2012 Map Screen Shot

You want to evaluate which of these risks has both the greatest impact on the project and the highest chance of occurring. Is there an easy, fast way to accomplish this? MindManager 2012’s Analysis View.

Analysis View allows you to take topics from your map and place them in a relational two dimensional matrix.  If you have ever used the four quadrant matrix popularized by Stephen Covey (Urgency vs. Importance) or use the Boston Consulting Group’s Market Growth vs. Relative Market Share matrix,  then you could definitely benefit from using Analysis View.

To get your team’s risks from the map into Analysis View, select all of the risks, then go to View, Analysis View and select New.

MM2012 Create A New Analysis View

This opens up an Analysis window with the topics displayed in the Unsorted Topics list on the left.

Analysis View

Then select the Configure button to configure the Analysis View to meet your requirements.  (Included in MindManager 2012 are a set of nine predefined templates. If you can’t find a template, you can customize the view to meet your individual needs.) In the Configure menu  select the Risk Analysis template and then type in a view name of Lead Project Risks and click on Done to apply it to the view.  You can see the two main View types:

1. Segmented, which applies the diagonal bands you see in the image above to break the risks into three categories.

2. Quadrant, which would have no bands – allowing you to place the topics into one of the four quadrants in the matrix.

You can now move the topics from the unsorted list on the left to the view on the right.  In the view below you can move the topic “Growth Down” from the list on the left by selecting it, and then clicking on the Move Topic Into View button at the bottom of the unsorted topics list.

You can click on the topic to move it around in the analysis matrix, until its position reflects the opinion of the team. Note that the axes are based on relative rankings (they run from low to high).  The main purpose of moving the topics is to create a qualitative analysis of the relative position of each of the risks.

Analysis View - Growth Down

You can go ahead and add all of the other risks and then move them relative to each other.

Analysis View - Mutiple Risks

As you can see, depending on where the topics fall on the bands on the chart, they are assigned the priorities 1, 2 or 3.  1 represents the highest risks (high likelihood and high impact on the project), 2 is medium risk and 3 is low risk.  The team can test the position of each topic against each other (i.e is the likelihood of missing a deadline higher or lower than that of a new competitor entering the market etc.).  You can also adjust the bands to increase or decrease the area covered by the three bands.  This is done by clicking on the Adjust Marker Region check box:

Save Analysis Template

After checking the box, you then move the band markers to create the positions that you prefer.

You can also move the marker on the bottom axis over to the far right “high impact” end of the axis, changing the New Competitor topic from a priority 2 to a priority 3.

Analysis View - Edit Axis Priority

Finally, you can save this analysis view as a template (this is useful if you have customized it, and want to reuse it in the future). Then you can apply the markers back into my map, showing the results of my risk analysis.

This analysis view will be saved with the map, allowing you to document the relative ranking of the risks for the future. You can also use the Copy View to Clipboard button in the upper left hand corner to copy a bit map of the analysis view.  You can then place that view in an email or in an electronic document.

MM2012 Risks Priority Saved Back Into A Map

There you have it! Some highlights of the powerful possibilities available in the new Analysis View.

5 Responses to “Maximizing MindManager 2012: Analysis View”

  1. Ray

    Mindjet should fix the problems some are having with this feature (black screen) before featuring  Analysis View too much.  

    Reply
  2. Charles Bartlett

    Have to admit I have concern over this feature. Specifically because, “You can click on the topic to move it around in the analysis matrix, until its position reflects the opinion of the team.”

    That sounds like a recipe for “death by meeting”. Ultimately, the position of a marker will be determined by the two most verbally dominant on the team.

    At first glance, I thought this feature was based on quantitative data. Meaning, there would be a mechanism for everyone on the team to rank each risk with separate values for ‘Urgency’ and ‘Importance’. In any single quadrant, a risk (topic) that received more votes would display higher in the box than a topic with less votes.

    This would lead to a better representation of the team’s opinion and would be much more collaborative. As it stands, the matrix is based on “gut feel” and team meeting dynamics.

    Very well could be I’m missing something here, so I’ll keep an open mind until I can run the feature through some scenarios.

    Reply
    • Eric

      I agree there is still a portion of gut-feeling BUT… There is a big difference in applying a subjective opinion on the size of the risk and to compare them along the perspectives in the 2×2 matrix. Especially when interactively dragging them and comparing them to each other. The Analysis view will definitely give more insight to the value of the risks.

      If still not convinced I recommend to put your own content in an Analysis view and see what insights you gain. I did a Customer Analysis for a client which made them review their strategy. Simply because they had an expectation of the result, but viewing it in the Analysis view and discussing the aspects made them get to a point where it became apparent that they didn’t view all aspects of their products values.

      Also interessting to take a brainstorming of the problem into an Analysis view. Try it out, gives insight.

      Reply

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