Guest Post – TEACHING with Mind Maps – Part 2 of Mind Maps in Education Series

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Mindjet

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July 26, 2010

Teacher toonIn the first post of this education series, I gave a general background on mind maps (what they are, how to draw them, how to use them) and described how students can use mind maps to learn. Now I want to show you how teachers can use mind maps to teach and connect with students.

Mind maps are a great tool to consolidate information from reading material, whether the information is coming from one source or multiple sources, and look at it from varied perspectives in a highly visual, interactive format. Mind mapping allows for better organization and clearer connections among concepts and topics, which, in turn, allows for more thorough examination, understanding, and presentation of subject matter.

How mind maps help teachers

Mind mapping enables teachers to manipulate ideas and concepts with great ease and flexibility, and helps present available information visually in a comprehensive and clear manner. Properly organizing information allows you to easily understand and evaluate existing knowledge and opens the door for effective communication of your knowledge.

The benefits of mind mapping to teachers can be summarized by five general functions:

1. Course planning: Mind maps help teachers manage their many classes and numerous activities throughout the hectic semester

2. Research for lectures: Mind maps help teachers find and collect information for lectures. They also help teachers to keep track of latest development in their field and share that information readily with students.

3. Lecture compositions: Mind maps help teachers summarize, organize, and present lecture information.

4. Presentations: Teachers and students can collaborate during the lecture by jointly manipulating the lecture mind map, making lectures fun and creative.

5. Assessment of students: Mind maps express students’ misconceptions just as clearly as their correct conceptions and can help students and instructors diagnose and remedy these misconceptions.

See the mind map below for more information on all five functions.

Teachers & Mind Maps2(Click here for just the Image file)

Although the benefits listed this article focus on teaching and learning, they span far beyond education and include uses in business, meetings, project management, and problem solving (see previous post).

Give mind mapping a try. It may be the key to unlocking the full potential of your teaching and your students’ learning.

Toni Krasnic is the author of CONCISE LEARNING: Learn More & Score Higher in Less Time with Less Effort. He is a mind mapper, a student success coach, and an educational consultant.  He also publishes the free, biweekly Student Success Newsletter.  His Web site, www.ConciseLearning.com, has many free, useful resources on mind mapping for students and teachers. You can connect with him on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

How do you use mind maps in teaching and elsewhere? Please share your experiences, ideas, questions, and suggestions as comments below.

7 Responses to “Guest Post – TEACHING with Mind Maps – Part 2 of Mind Maps in Education Series”

  1. Toni Krasnic

    Hi Fred,rnrnThanks for reminding us about the importance of developing and sharing case studies to show how mind maps can be used in real life, especially in U.S. schools, where the use of mind maps has yet to appear on the radar. rnrnOne obstacle to the adoption of mind mapping in schools could be teachersu2019 hesitation with u201cnewu201d technology, but the other issue, even more troublesome to me, is that students are not yet using it. Their hesitation in experimenting with technology is undoubtedly much less than that of professors, yet theyu2019re not trying it out. Why? Is it because they donu2019t know about it? In that case, we should outreach to schools as much as we do to businesses. Or is it that they canu2019t afford the one they like? In that case, can a new pricing scheme be developed for schools (e.g., use fee in lieu of purchase)? Or is it that they donu2019t believe the results? In that scenario, case studies would definitely help. Or is it a mix of all three and more, in which case we should be doing our best on all fronts?rnrnFew more educational case studies are available at http://www.mindjet.com/what-is-mindjet/customer-stories/case-studies/overview?csc=1. I especially like the two case studies by Sakaguchi and Chopra.

    Reply
  2. Fred Kerr

    I've been fascinated with MindManager in teaching ever since the Mindjet example of MindManager in the law classroom by Professor Jerry Kang at the UCLA School of Law (see Mindjet case study (http://www.mindjet.com/export/sites/default/why…) and also Professor Kang’s own website (http://jerrykang.net/Teach/Misc/IT_in_Teaching) where he provides more detailed information on how he uses IT in Teaching). Those comments are dated (circa 1998 and updated 2002). Not much has been said about it since that time in the depth that Professor Kang's comments do. I am hoping someone will update this type of information in at least as much depth. Surely he can't be the only one doing this.

    Reply
    • Toni Krasnic

      Hi Fred,

      Thanks for reminding us about the importance of developing and sharing case studies to show how mind maps can be used in real life, especially in U.S. schools, where the use of mind maps has yet to appear on the radar.

      One obstacle to the adoption of mind mapping in schools could be teachers’ hesitation with “new” technology, but the other issue, even more troublesome to me, is that students are not yet using it. Their hesitation in experimenting with technology is undoubtedly much less than that of professors, yet they’re not trying it out. Why? Is it because they don’t know about it? In that case, we should outreach to schools as much as we do to businesses. Or is it that they can’t afford the one they like? In that case, can a new pricing scheme be developed for schools (e.g., use fee in lieu of purchase)? Or is it that they don’t believe the results? In that scenario, case studies would definitely help. Or is it a mix of all three and more, in which case we should be doing our best on all fronts?

      Few more educational case studies are available at http://www.mindjet.com/what-is-mindjet/customer…. I especially like the two case studies by Sakaguchi and Chopra.

      Reply
  3. Scott Bridges

    I use MindManager 7 on and off again in the classroom. As a science teacher, I find that it consistently falls short for me in the area of presenting mathematical or chemical equations. The inability to use subscripts or superscripts really hinders its use when teaching science or math. I've repeatedly requested this feature since MindManager 4.

    Reply

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